Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics



SPECIAL SECTION: ETHICAL LIMITS IN HUMAN SUBJECTS RESEARCH

The Involuntary Research Subject


JERRY  MENIKOFF  a1
a1 Jerry Menikoff, M.D., J.D., is Associate Professor of Law, Ethics, and Medicine and Associate Director of the Institute for Law, Bioethics, and Public Policy at the University of Kansas, Kansas City

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menikoff j   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Informed consent is the bedrock principle on which most of modern research ethics rest. That principle, like most others, has some exceptions, such as for emergency situations and for some studies involving very low risk. But what about situations that do not fall into either of these categories? Are there such research studies that are so important to society that we nonetheless are willing to involuntarily enroll subjects, without their informed consent?



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